Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

The 3BL Media CSR feed - full text version

older | 1 | .... | 382 | 383 | (Page 384) | 385 | 386 | .... | 395 | newer

    0 0

    SOURCE:CBRE Group, Inc.

    DESCRIPTION:

    Action for Children became CBRE’s new UK charity partner, after a UK-wide vote in February 2018. Action for Children is a truly inspiring charity that helps thousands of disadvantaged children across the UK.

    Over the next two years, our aim is to work with Action for Children to build, safe, stable homes for more than 700 children and their parents in the care system.

    Our plan is to raise £500,000 by February 2020. These funds will help Action for Children to:

    • hire 5 specialist workers across the UK who will work directly with children transitioning from care into independent living.
    • digitalise a new advise booklet for children in care and a handbook for their foster parents. These tools will provide up to date information and help prevent placements from breaking down, ensuring children in care have the safe, stable and loving homes they deserve.

    Tweet me:Infographic: How we're working with @actnforchildren to build safe and stable homes http://bit.ly/2Sj3UUR @CBRE_UK

    KEYWORDS: stable homes, UK, children in care, csr, action for children, NYSE:CBRE


    0 0

    A Social enterprise delivers health services in India’s rural communities driven by disruptive technology and trained frontline health workers

    SOURCE:Business Call to Action (BCtA)

    DESCRIPTION:

    KOLKATA, India, December 27, 2018 /3BL Media/ - iKure is a rapidly growing tech start up, providing primary healthcare across rural, semi urban and urban populations in India. The company’s business model is composed of a unique combination of health outreach initiatives, skills development and technology-based interventions, promising to empower 5000 health entrepreneurs and deliver affordable health care to 25 million people across 11 Indian States.

    Launched in 2008, BCtA aims to accelerate progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by challenging companies to develop inclusive business models that engage people with less than US$10 per day in purchasing power (in 2015 dollars) as consumers, producers, suppliers and distributors. Over 225 companies, ranging from multinationals to social enterprises, and working in 70 countries, have responded to the BCtA by committing to improve the lives and livelihoods of millions in developing countries through access to markets, financial services, affordable healthcare, water and sanitation, education and other critical services.

    Rural health is a global challenge, not only because primary health services are generally not accessible or affordable to rural communities, but also because of the lack of capacity to implement programmes that address rural health care needs in a harmonized and holistic way.

    In India, 70 percent of the rural population (or over 840 million people) are served by less than 30 percent of the country’s combined medical force. This means there is one doctor per 19,000 people on average. Many families simply have no access to health care or are forced to rely on unreliable treatment plans and unqualified practitioners. Access to health care in rural communities is further complicated by long distances, lack of infrastructure, lack of education and poverty.

    iKure addresses these challenges by operating through a hub-and-spoke clinic model, where a core medical team utilizing modern procedures and equipment are stationed at hub clinic. Trained community health workers, who are selected and trained from each village, then visit peripheral clinics (spokes) on a regular basis and provide reliable access to on-site general medicine, maternal and child health care, eye care, telemedicine services, and pathology services to cater to the demand of specific diseases. After six months in the programme, community health workers become self-sustaining entrepreneurs, who generate income through selling and promoting products from the iKure supply chain.

    Technology forms a key part of iKure’s impact, as it enables patient information to be captured by community health workers on point-of-care devices offline. The information is uploaded to cloud storage when health workers return to web-connected areas. This process facilitates early diagnosis and tertiary linkages otherwise non-existent in India’s remote settings. Equipped with this information, iKure analyzes the root causes of ailments and addresses them holistically through combination of health and hygiene, nutrition and other aspects. By doing this, iKure creates an ecosystem of spokes clinics for diagnosis and minor treatments, hospitals for secondary and tertiary care and research organisations for clinical and technical knowhow of various ailments.

     “Our holistic approach towards health is supported by community-based interventions that are able to adapt to the different language, culture, diet, political power, literacy rates, ethnicity, employment and health services that exist in each area. This way, we are able to meet local needs as defined by the local community,” said ikure CEO Sujay Santra.

    “iKure’s model offers a three-layered approach that impacts the health and wellbeing of the individual patient, empowers community members as entrepreneurs and connects stakeholders at a global level to deliver future outcomes in rural health,” said Paula Pelaez, Head of Business Call to Action.

    For further information: 
    BCtA: aimee.brown@undp.org   
    iKure: sujay@ikure.in

    BCtA membership does not constitute a partnership with its funding and programme partners, UNDP or any UN agency.

    About Business Call to Action (BCtA): Launched at the United Nations in 2008, BCtA aims to accelerate progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by challenging companies to develop inclusive business models that offer the potential for both commercial success and development impact. BCtA is supported by  the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), UK Department for International Development (DFID), and hosted by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). For more information, please visit www.businesscalltoaction.org. 

    About iKure: iKure is an award-winning, tech-savvy, rapidly-growing, revenue-positive social enterprise that meets the primary health care and prevention needs through a unique combination of health outreach initiative, skills development, and technology intervention. The venture is poised to rapidly scale beyond its curative model, looking to the future of disease prevention and wellness for 840 million people in rural India. iKure’s healthcare model has acquired extensive support and recognitions from across the world for being innovative, technologically advanced and sustainable.

    Tweet me:A Social enterprise delivers #AffordableHealth services in #India’s rural communities driven by disruptive #technology and trained frontline health workers http://bit.ly/2S9LPIJ @BCtAInitiative @iKureTechSoft

    KEYWORDS: business call to action (bcta), iKure


    0 0

    G&A's Sustainability Highlights (12.20.2018)

    SOURCE:Governance & Accountability Institute, Inc.

    DESCRIPTION:

    In these last days of the year 2018, of course, we’ll be seeing shared expert perspectives on the year now ending and a look into the new year, 2019.  Sustainable Brands shared one person’s perspectives on three sustainability trends that are gaining momentum heading into 2019.

    The commentary is authored by Renee Yardley, VP-Sales & Marketing of Rolland Inc., a prominent North American commercial & security paper manufacturer established in 1882. The company strives to be an environmental leader in the pulp and paper industry. A wide range of fine paper products is made using renewable energy, recycled fiber, and de-inked without the use of chlorine.  Rolland started making recycled paper in 1989 and adopted biogas energy in 2004. The company is privately-owned and headquartered in Quebec, Canada.

    The trends the author explains, of course, affect users of all types of paper products but also are useful for businesses in other sectors & industries; he sees:  (1) a shifting of global recycling mindsets and in the circular economy; (2) more open collaboration and partnerships for impactful change; and (3) the need measurement and efforts to quantify impact. 

    Rolland is a paper supply company and so there is a focus on recycled (post-consumer) paper, fiber, forests, the recycled paper process, moving toward zero waste, municipal recycling in North America, and so on.

    On recycling:  we are seeing reports now of problems arising in the waste stream; in the USA, municipalities are calling for a reduction of waste and automating processes (to help reduce costs).  There are new online marketplaces as well for buying and selling recovered items.  The “market solution” is a great hope for the future as we continue to use paper products (we are not quite a paperless society, are we?).

    Part of the issues recycling advocates are dealing with:  China is restricting the import of recyclable materials (think:  that paper you put at curbside at home of business).  Consumers can be encouraged to reduce consumption but paper is paper and we all use it every day – so new approaches are urgently needed!

    This is just the introduction of G&A's Sustainability Highlights newsletter this week. Click here to view full issue. 

    Tweet me:Recycling – The Circular Economy: Admirable Efforts, With Significant Challenges As The Efforts Expand & Become More Complex for Businesses http://bit.ly/2T0HyHn

    KEYWORDS: MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS, business & trade, Corporate Social Responsibility, csr, G&A Institute, GRI, Governance & Accountability Institute, SRI, SWF, socially responsible investing, Sovereign Wealth Funds, sustainability, Corporate Citizenship, esg


    0 0

    By Sadie Marshall-Corley

    SOURCE:Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption

    DESCRIPTION:

    Sadie and her husband, Cody, adopted their son, Latrell, through the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption’s Wendy’s Wonderful Kids program. The Corleys, who live in Louisiana, want to raise awareness about the importance of foster care adoption, and specifically, the critical need to find permanent, loving homes for teenagers in foster care.

    People often say that our son is ‘lucky’ to have us, but they could never understand that we are the ones who are truly lucky and blessed to have him.

    My husband, Cody, and I had thought about adoption for a while. But adopting a teenager was never the plan, until it was. Cody is a middle school teacher and had a 14-year-old student named Latrell. Cody and Latrell formed a bond that extended from class to extracurricular activities. And it was during this time that Cody learned that Latrell was in foster care. Months later, I met Latrell.
    Latrell spent eight years in foster care. He needed a family. Before we finished the certification process, Latrell was moved to Monroe, Louisiana, which was about two hours away. Frustrated, but not deterred, we pressed on. We exchanged phone numbers, became Facebook friends and traveled to Monroe to take Latrell to dinner so we could see him and continue getting to know him.

    In October 2016, Latrell asked us if we were interested in adopting him. Prior to that, we had just been getting to know one another and hadn’t made any solid plans or promises. My heart almost burst when he asked that one question. It took a few more months, but Latrell moved into our home in February 2017.

    During this process, Kerri Byrd, our Wendy’s Wonderful Kids recruiter, was our guardian angel. I can’t tell you how many times I called her crying. The process was slow, and I felt like it was robbing us of time with our son. He was already 15, and we had limited time before he’d be off to college or living on his own.

    While Latrell was already a teenager when we met, his experiences had been so limited. It was heartbreaking at first, but we realized that it allowed us to experience a lot of the typical “firsts” with him that are often missed when an older child is adopted. We got to teach him how to drive and give him his own room for the first time in his life. We bought him his first plane ticket for his first trip out of state. We gave him his first dog, helped him secure his first job, and more. It has been an incredible journey.

    The biggest change for Latrell has been his grades. When he came to us, he was nearly failing. Today, he has a 3.5 GPA. He is now confident. It has been more amazing than I have the words to describe watching him blossom and develop a sense of self.

    To anyone considering foster care adoption, a teenager can bring out the most love and hope a person can have in their heart. We are so lucky to have met Latrell and be given the opportunity to bring him into our family. He is the light of our world, and we couldn’t imagine life without him in it.

    The Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption’s Wendy’s Wonderful Kids program provides grants to adoption agencies to hire and train recruiters in our Child-Focused Recruitment Model to find loving, permanent homes for the nearly 155,000 children waiting in foster care across the United States and Canada. The model is up to three times more effective at serving youth who have been in foster care the longest. Click here to learn more.

    Consider supporting our mission here and giving the gift of family.

    Tweet me:"He is the light of our world, and we couldn’t imagine life without him in it.” Read more about how foster care adoption and @DTFA are changing the lives of teenagers. http://bit.ly/2ElRUxH #Adoption #FosterCare #FindingForeverFamilie

    KEYWORDS: Dave Thomas, foster care, adoption, Recruiter, forever family, Wendy’s, National Adoption Month, Instant Family, Mark Wahlberg, Wendy’s Wonderful Kids, holiday, Giving, Gifts, gift, family, Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, Sadie Marshall-Corley, Cody Marshall-Corley

      


    0 0

    7 more brands giving back this holiday season

    SOURCE:Whole Foods Market Foundations

    DESCRIPTION:

    88 Acres

    Woman-founded 88 Acres first opened its doors in Boston, where Whole Planet Foundation funds microcredit through microfinance partner Grameen America. Their goal was to open their bakery in an area of need to drive job growth in the community. Through their continued partnership with Whole Planet Foundation, 88 Acres also creates economic prosperity by finding microloans to support women microentrepreneurs domestically and internationally.

    During the month of December, $0.10 from 88 Acres Seed Butters sold in select Whole Foods Market stores will be donated to Whole Planet Foundation.

    Aspiring Artists of the Earth

    Aspiring Artists of the Earth (Here are) has been supplying Whole Foods Market stores with artisan-crafted collections for 13 years now. Owner and resident artist, Tari Zarka, also the resident glass artist, draws and digitizes the artwork used in their wood collections, which are made entirely in-house in Pennsylvania.

    “We believe in giving back. We donate a minimum of 5% of our profits to charity annually. We’re proud to support other female entrepreneurs with Whole Planet Foundation, donating $0.10 of each item sold in select Whole Foods Market stores during the month of December,” says Tari.

    Goodie Girl

    In 2010, Goodie Girl founder Shira Berk was running the café inside her children’s preschool when a fellow parent challenged her to create a gluten-free cookie modeled after the ones baked at the café. Today, she has built a sweet business selling cookies for people with special diets.

    “As a minority-run business, we’ve chosen to support Whole Planet Foundation this holiday season because we want to empower women microentrepreneurs in global communities,” said Shira Berk, Founder of Goodie Girl.”

    With every Goodie Girl cookie product sold in select Whole Foods Market stores, 3% of sales will be donated to Whole Planet Foundation.

    Greyston

    Greyston Bakery’s unique partnership with Whole Planet Foundation has served to advance both organizations’ social initiatives. In addition to supporting job creation at the Bakery, a percentage of brownie sales benefit Whole Planet Foundation.

    The team at Greyston Bakery says of the partnership: “During this holiday season and at a time when there is so much turmoil and inequality in the world, it’s comforting to know that Whole Planet Foundation continues to help alleviate poverty by lifting up some of the poorest entrepreneurs throughout the world with microloans. Greyston Bakery is proud to be a supporter of this life-changing mission. We also believe in helping others and we’ve been practicing that for over 35 years through our Open Hire™ policy where people with barriers to employment get hired – no questions asked.”

    With every purchase of a Greyston Bakery brownie at select Whole Foods Market stores, $0.25 will be donated to Whole Planet Foundation.

    Health-Ade

    Health-Ade Kombucha was started in 2012 by a husband, wife, and best friend in a true farmers’ market start-up story: a small credit card and a big dream to make REAL FOOD.

    Founder and CSO, Vanessa Dew says, “Whole Planet Foundation is aligned to Health-Ade’s values through and through.  One of Health-Ade’s main pillars of growth is built upon the entrepreneurial spirit and the extent to which we can support others to ‘follow their gut’, particularly when making huge social impact, is a position we will always take. The opportunity Whole Planet Foundation offers to tenacious, innovative, hardworking entrepreneurs that need access to resources to rise up from poverty is priceless.  We are proud partners of that mission especially during this season of giving, where everyone involved in making the future brighter, like Whole Planet Foundation, deserves a little Holiday Cheers!”

    For every purchase of Health-Ade’s Holiday Cheers kombucha at select Whole Foods Market stores, $0.10 will be donated to Whole Planet Foundation.

    Mop Top

    MopTop’s founder Kelly Foreman went years without a good hair day until she began the quest to find beauty in her wild curls. MopTop was the result – a line of natural, junk-free products that will make your hair turn heads, for all the best reasons.

    “Whole Planet Foundation totally lines up with our core values of Do the Right Thing & Empower our customers and each other! Love, love, love working to make a positive change in this world,” says Kelly, founder of Mop Top.

    With every purchase of MopTop products in select Whole Foods Market stores during the month of December, $0.50 will be donated to Whole Planet Foundation.

    The Republic of Tea

    The Republic of Tea embodies the ancient Chinese philosophy of Tashun — the Great Harmony — when people naturally care about the world and depend on each other for the well-being of the whole. It is a collective concern for others and aspiration to seek opportunities, initiatives and actions that will better the human condition as well as the planet.

    Through years of partnership with Whole Planet Foundation, The Republic of Tea has witnessed first-hand the incredible impact and success that comes from microfinance, empowering and lifting women and families out of poverty around the world where they source fine teas and herbs.

    During the month of December, $1.50 from every tin of Biodynamic Holiday Chai sold in select Whole Foods Market stores will be donated to Whole Planet Foundation.

    Learn more by visiting wholeplanetfoundation.org

    Tweet me:Here are 7 more brands who pledging to support #microloans for #womenentrepreneurs through @WholePlanet Foundation when you purchase their products at your local @WholeFoods this December http://bit.ly/2A8b730

    KEYWORDS: Whole Foods Market, Whole Foods Market Foundations, whole planet foundation, NASDAQ:WFM, The Republic of Tea, MopTop, Health-Ade Kombucha, Greyston, Goodie Girl, Aspiring Artists of the Earth, AAOTE, 88 Acres

          


    0 0

    The latest insights from Amy Domini

    SOURCE:GreenMoney Journal

    DESCRIPTION:

    by Amy Domini, Founder, Domini Impact Investments

    On October 23, 2018 the Financial Times published an article stating that Larry Fink, CEO of the world’s largest asset manager, BlackRock, had announced that “sustainable investing will be a core component for how everyone invests in the future.” He further explained that sustainable investing did not lead to lower returns and that in his own opinion such a strategy will lead to higher returns.

    The news story was of particular interest to me for two reasons. First, there was the fact that my field, so long considered a tiny outlier in the field of finance, had survived to become the declared future of financial asset management by someone whose efforts to build my field were not notable a decade ago. Second, was the use of “Sustainable Investing” rather than “Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG),” which most big banks and asset managers are more comfortable using.

    In my opinion, Mr. Fink’s statement means that we early advocates have convinced the world of the need for adding ‘people and the planet’ into our way of investing, and it means that the world’s most conventional asset manager doesn’t need an academic catch phrase to hide behind. Larry Fink is okay with saying the word sustainability. Simply acknowledging that making money at the cost of losing our planet is unsustainable is an extraordinary step forward for the masters of Wall Street.

    He isn’t alone. My local CFA Society in Boston just invited me to register for the Sustainable Investing Seminar. It is being led by Jeremy Grantham, the co-founder of Grantham Mayo Van Oterloo, only one of the largest asset managers in the world. He is quoted on my invitation as saying, “We are racing to protect more than our portfolios from stranded assets and other climate change impact…But for those portfolio managers who happen to be human, we have a much more important job. We are racing to protect not just our portfolios, not just our grandchildren, but our species. So get to it.”

    These men are the sort of advisors who used to say to me, “Look, I agree with you about all that important stuff, it’s just that I have to keep blinders on and look only for profit or I am letting my clients down.” It was an easy out, and it got dangerous. In October 2008 the Department of Labor (DOL) altered the language guiding fiduciaries. I underline the new words they used. “The named fiduciary must carry out this responsibility solely in the participants’ and beneficiaries’ interest in the economic value of the plan assets…” In other words, it is okay to kill off the beneficiaries if you protect the plan assets. Late in 2016 the DOL reverted to the prior language after eight years of efforts by my industry to keep people in the standards that fiduciaries consider.

    The above example demonstrates what a small tweak in language can lead to – it can change the entire mission from protecting people to protecting money. It also demonstrates the importance of conventional investment managers shouldering responsibility for people. I say this because only when my industry was joined by many conventional asset managers – complaining that they were being locked out of tremendous clients demand for green venture capital – did the DOL reverse the language.

    2018 is beginning to look as though it may be the year in which not just we, but the world, starts to appreciate the remarkable impact from the very existence of our field.

    To be sure, the outcomes have been there all along, but now they are more clearly the direct result of our existence and of nothing else. In Domini Impact Investment’s Impact Report we name a few. We point out that in 2016 the sustainable Stock Exchanges Initiative found that 58 stock exchanges, representing over 70 percent of listed equity markets have made a public commitment to advancing sustainability. Would that have happened without investors asking for information about social and environmental impacts? We note that in 2017 the United Nations program, Principles for Responsible Investment, published a model tax policy that aligns the company’s business and sustainability strategies. Would the United Nations have noticed this intersection without our efforts to bring it forward? To download our full impact report, with many more examples, vist the Domini.com website. 

    Read Amy Domini's full article herehttps://greenmoneyjournal.com/the-year-wall-street-got-sustainable-investing 

    Article by Amy Domini, Founder and Chair of Domini Impact Investments  She is widely recognized as the leading voice for socially responsible investing. In 2005, Time magazine named her to the Time 100 list of the world’s most influential people. In 2006, she was awarded an honorary Doctor of Business Administration degree from Northeastern University College of Law. Yale University’s Berkeley Divinity School presented Ms. Domini with an honorary doctorate in 2007. In 2008, Ms. Domini was named to Directorship magazine’s Directorship 100, the magazine’s listing of the most influential people on corporate governance and in the boardroom.

    =======

    Tweet me:The Year Wall Street Got Sustainable Investing by Amy Domini, founder, Domini Impact Investments -- http://bit.ly/2AcLdes || #impinv #impactinvesting #womeninfinance #esg #csr #advisors

    Contact Info:

    Cliff Feigenbaum, founder and managing editor
    GreenMoney Journal and GreenMoney.com
    +1 (505) 577-1563
    cliffgmj@gmail.com

    KEYWORDS: women, Boardrooms, Bueinss, Leadership, Women in Management, Gender Equality, BlackRock, sustainable investing, Finance, financial asset management, money manager, esg, environmental, social, governance, stranded assets, climate change, Jeremy Grantham, impact investing, foundations, Sustainable Stock Exchanges Initiative, Principles for Responsible Investment, KPMG, sustainability, Reporting, small investors, institutional investors, sustainable development goals, non-financial data, socially responsible investing

     


    0 0

    SOURCE:Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE)

    DESCRIPTION:

    • With a finite amount of resources available to us, it’s essential for both individuals and businesses to make a greater commitment to sustainability
    • By addressing the full product lifecycle, companies can help reach the ultimate goal of net-zero environmental impact

    CSO Chris Wellise explores how looking at the entire product lifecycle can help businesses achieve a more sustainable future

    We have just one Earth.

    But at our current rate of consumption, we need about 1.7 Earths in order to provide all of the resources we expend on an annual basis.

    Given the challenges our planet faces today due to energy and resource consumption, further exacerbated by population growth, the concept of sustainability – in order to truly live up to its name – must be more comprehensive than perfunctory efforts. Indeed, we must bend the curve from a take-make-dispose model to a regenerative and restorative system that eliminates waste through the superior design of materials, products, and business models.

    That approach is the foundation for the Circular Economy, a sustainability paradigm with the ultimate goal of creating net-zero impact by addressing every phase of the product lifecycle: from resource extraction to product design and use, through to end-of-use management.

    When Circular Economy principles are embraced, it’s good for both business and our planet. While environmental disruption creates vulnerabilities from material scarcity or fluctuating commodity prices; actively managing our consumption creates infrastructure efficiencies, opportunities for innovation, and business resilience. We fully believe that at HPE– as we announced today with the release of our new Circular Economy Report – we can help organizations drive financial and business results with efficient solutions that maximize material, resource, and equipment efficiencies for IT infrastructure.

    At HPE, we are following Circular Economy principles as we innovate the IT infrastructure of the future, not simply because of the environmental and societal benefits but because it is a strong driver for economic growth.

    As we indicate in the Circular Economy Report, which is available to HPE Financial Services Lease Return and Asset Upcycling Services customers, HPE is able to provide IT and sustainability organizations with information about the carbon, energy, material, and landfill savings achieved by returning retired or end-of-use assets to us for processing through HPE Technology Renewal Centers.

    Specifically, the report, based on sophistical life-cycle-analysis and economic assessment, shows a breakdown by category of the IT products that were refurbished, remarketed and reintroduced into the economy as products, and those that were recycled and put back into the economy as recycled materials.

    This is important information for organizations to share, especially as investors and customers increasingly request the disclosure of a company’s environmental impacts. But even more important than the information is the message behind it:

    That we have the capability to find new ways to manage the explosive demand for data by using far less space, materials, and energy.

    We have an opportunity to use the power of technology and our position as a global company to enable our customers to transition to a more Circular Economy. Although the concept is not a new one, we are at an inflection point today as companies accelerate their digital transformations and ditch legacy hardware for new solutions.

    HPE is taking the initiative to help our customers optimize their IT infrastructure by leveraging our global expertise to drive more efficient use of energy, materials, and resources. That means innovating IT solutions that reduce total cost of ownership and meet tightening regulations around the world, as well as putting used equipment with value back into the economy. In this way, our Circular Economy approach connects the goals of IT organizations and corporate sustainability strategies – meeting and exceeding the expectations of customers.

    We have many ways of helping customers do just that – from our Design for Environment program, to Asset Upcycling Services, to consumption models that shift ownership away from the customer, leading to higher rates of efficiency and reuse. And we know that customers are demanding this: HPE’s Technology Renewal Centers processed 58 million pounds of equipment in FY18, while HPE GreenLake pay-per-use solution now has more than US $2 billion in total contract value.

    The Circular Economy isn’t academic theory. It’s a pragmatic plan of action that encompasses the entire product lifecycle, while maximizing the greatest value to both business and environment.

    And doesn’t our Earth deserve that?

    Tweet me:By addressing the full product lifecycle, companies can help reach the ultimate goal of net-zero environmental impact http://bit.ly/2A2T4uI #circulareconomy @HPE_LivingProg

    KEYWORDS: HPE, circular economy


    0 0

    SOURCE:Booz Allen Hamilton

    DESCRIPTION:

    Over half (52 percent) of highly qualified women working for STEM companies leave their jobs, according to research by the Center for Talent Innovation (CTI). Yet one fifth of women currently employed in STEM are in senior-level positions, respected for their expertise, and satisfied with their jobs.

    What differentiates the women who stay in STEM and succeed? To find out, CTI conducted a national survey of more than 3,000 individuals and conducted dozens of interviews and focus group conversations. This included talking with Dr. Velma Deleveaux, director, and Susan Penfield, executive vice president and chief innovation officer, from Booz Allen.

    Six differentiating strategies

    Findings from the study, including six strategies for success, were highlighted in a Harvard Business Review article earlier this year.

    One strategy was “invest in peer networks.” Penfield shared how she recruited a protégé to the company with expertise in health-related data and systems, an area where she needed to gain knowledge. Both women learned from each other and continue to grow in their positions.

    To illustrate another strategy, “telegraphing confidence,” the article revealed that 82 percent of women in STEM say their contributions are ignored. Dr. Deleveaux discussed how to quickly and tactfully respond if someone repeats an idea as if it were their own.

    Read more in the full article in Harvard Business Review, and learn how Booz Allen supports women in STEM.

    Tweet me:What do successful women in #STEM have in common? @BoozAllen @TalentInnovate @HarvardBiz http://bit.ly/2AhrpGS

    KEYWORDS: Booz Allen Hamilton, STEM, NYSE: BAH, Harvard Business Review, Center for Talent Innovation, women in stem


    0 0

    by Amy Brown

    SOURCE:TriplePundit

    DESCRIPTION:

    Genetic testing is a booming business. The global DNA testing market is set to reach over $10 billion by 2022, according to a study by Grand View Research. More than 12 million Americans have already sent their DNA to be analyzed by companies like 23andMe and AncestryDNA. And that number is rising: AncestryDNA sold about 1.5 million testing kits between Black Friday and Cyber Monday last year. With the top testing companies advertising holiday specials on their websites, there’s no doubt these kits will be found in many a stocking again this season.

    But as DNA testing continues to grow in popularity, a key concern is often ignored: privacy. Testing companies have acknowledged that DNA data is sometimes shared with or sold to third parties for use in research. In July, 23andMe announced a partnership with GlaxoSmithKline through which the pharmaceutical company will use home DNA results from 23andMe’s 5 million customers for new drug research.

    The thorny ethical questions that come along with handling such deeply personal data have become the keen focus of Peter Pitts. A former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, he now serves as president of the Center for Medicine in the Public Interest Forensic Genetics Policy Initiative, which advocates for greater scrutiny about the implications of data privacy around DNA testing.

    “The industry’s rapid growth rests on a dangerous delusion that genetic data is kept private,” Pitts wrote in Forbes last year. “Most people assume this sensitive information simply sits in a secure database, protected from hacks and misuse. Far from it. Genetic-testing companies cannot guarantee privacy. And many are actively selling user data to outside parties.”

    The popularity of these kits is understandable. For less than $100, people can discover their ancestry and uncover potentially dangerous genetic mutations. The problem, as Pitts sees it, is that these DNA results are increasingly leveraged for applications that go far beyond customer curiosity.

    DNA testing companies profit, for example, from lucrative deals with pharmaceutical firms, yet customers rarely get a share of the revenue generated from their DNA results. In the case of the GSK partnership, customers can opt out of having their data used for research, but Pitts says the companies should pay the 23andMe customers whose DNA is used.

    “There is almost a complete lack of awareness among the public about this issue,” Pitts told TriplePundit. “The DNA kits are being viewed as stocking stuffers or cocktail party conversation. People don’t think about the security of their DNA as they don’t realize its value. You can change your Social Security number or your computer password, but you can’t change your DNA. I’m not saying DNA testing doesn’t have value, but people don’t understand the privacy and security implications.”

    Potential for misuse of data

    Once genetic data has been linked to a specific person, the potential for abuse is vast and frightening, Pitts said. “Imagine a political campaign exposing a rival’s elevated risk of Alzheimer’s. Or an employer refusing to hire someone because autism runs in her family. Imagine a world where people can have their genomic building blocks held against them. Such abuses represent a profound violation of privacy. That’s an inherent risk in current genetic-testing practices.”

    The problem, he explained, starts with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), a 1996 federal law that allows medical companies to share and sell patient data if it has been “anonymized,” or scrubbed of any obvious identifying characteristics.

    The Portability Act was passed when genetic testing was just “a distant dream on the horizon of personalized medicine,” Pitts noted. “But today, that loophole has proven to be a cash cow.”

    For instance, 23andMe has sold access to its database to at least 13 outside pharmaceutical firms. One buyer, Genentech, paid $10 million for the genetic profiles of people suffering from Parkinson’s disease.

    Data in the wrong hands

    “Customers are wrong to think their information is safely locked away. It’s not; it’s getting sold far and wide,” Pitts told us. Further, many testing firms that generally don’t sell patient information, such as Ambry and Invitae, give it away to public databases, he explained.

    Such transfers leave a big gap in privacy protections. “Hacks are inevitable. Easily accessible, public genetic depositories are obvious targets.”

    If genetic data does fall into the hands of “nefarious actors,” Pitts warned, “it’s relatively easy for them to de-anonymize it. New lab techniques can unearth genetic markers tied to specific, physical traits, such as eye or hair color. Sleuths can then cross-reference those traits against publicly-available demographic data to identify the donors.”

    Lost in the fine print

    Pitts says that direct-to-consumer testing companies have been less than forthright about these dangers, usually burying privacy disclaimers deep in their contracts and refusing to disclose how long they keep customer data or how it can be used. New research published in the journal Nature found that genetic-testing companies frequently fail to meet even basic international transparency standards.

    While Pitts maintains that AncestryDNA “all but owns the data that customers submit,” an AncestryDNA spokeperson said, “Ancestry very clearly disclaims any ownership of our customers’ genetic information.”

    AncestryDNA’s Privacy Statement describes user provided content as information individuals provide about themselves or other living individuals when they voluntarily contribute to Ancestry.com’s services. The section on Genetic Information states that DNA data is stored so that it is “available for future testing,” but that such testing may be done only if users agree to Informed Consent for Research or otherwise consent to future testing. The section also states that genetic information may be used for “conducting scientific, statistical, and historical research.” It further states that if requested, it will delete all genetic information that an individual has submitted within 30 days. Those who have agreed to the Informed Consent to Research will not be able to have genetic information removed from active or completed research projects but Ancestry states it would not use it for any new research projects.

    23andMe customers, Pitts said, have to wade through pages of fine print before learning that their information may be “shared with research partners, including commercial partners.”

    Meanwhile, Invitae’s privacy policy reveals that it may use patients’ “de-identified” data for “research and development” or “general research purposes.” And the company can share that data with third parties such as public databases, other laboratories and universities.

    Further, federal genetic privacy laws do not apply to life, long-term care or disability insurers. These companies are legally permitted to access genetic testing data and charge people higher prices or deny coverage based on their findings, Pitts said.

    Regulators enter the fray

    Some legislators have recently raised concerns about the privacy implications of DNA testing. In November, Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer of New York called for increased federal scrutiny of consumer DNA testing companies and their privacy practices. While the FDA regulates consumer DNA tests related to health, Schumer wants the Federal Trade Commission to force testing firms to extract all of the buried fine print about how they might distribute DNA data and broadcast it loud and clear.

    “I think if most people knew that this information could be sold to third parties, they would think twice,” Schumer said at a press conference last month. “The last gift any of us want to give away this holiday season is our most personal and sensitive information.”

    The state of Minnesota is also exploring legislation around direct-to-consumer DNA testing. While genetic testing companies doing business in Minnesota are subject to the state’s existing consumer protection laws, it lacks an enforcement mechanism for such companies, legislators noted. Pitts testified before the Legislative Commission on Data Practices in December.

    Minnesota is looking toward Alaska, which has a Genetic Privacy Act that the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a privacy advocacy organization, described as “exemplary” and “comprehensive.” The Alaska statute requires written informed consent for the collection, analysis, retention, or disclosure of DNA samples and test results. It also declares that a DNA sample and the results of any genomic analysis are the “exclusive property of the person sampled or analyzed.”

    It comes down to trust and transparency

    Pitts isn’t sold on regulation as the sole solution. “Honest, robust self-awareness is better than regulation,” he told us, adding that most DNA-testing companies have been “standoffish” in the face of regulation.

    “These companies have to ramp up their awareness about government relations and overall be better partners in the genetic testing system,” Pitts said. “Trust and transparency” is at the heart of the issue, he continued. “There should be responsible parties on all sides of this conversation.”

    For their part, the leading consumer genetic and personal genomic testing companies—23andMe, Ancestry, Helix, MyHeritage and Habit—joined the nonprofit Future of Privacy Forum to release Privacy Best Practices for Consumer Genetic Testing Services. They were joined by African Ancestry, FamilyTreeDNA and Living DNA in supporting the Best Practices as “a clear articulation of how leading firms can build trust with consumers.”

    Some critics, however, have called out these best practices for being voluntary and for lacking restrictions on the use or release of de-identified data.

    Both Ancestry and 23andMe have acknowledged the criticism that has come with more widespread use of their products. But the companies maintain that their customers understand the trade-offs and have the opportunity to opt out at any time.

    Linda Avey, co-founder of 23andMe, concedes that nothing is foolproof. “It’s a fallacy to think that genomic data can be fully anonymized,” she told Undark, an independent digital magazine.

    In short, it’s up to consumers to decide whether or not to use DNA-testing kits or similar services, but Pitts encouraged people to keep these acknowledged risks in mind when making their decision. “What you risk reveals what you value,” he concluded. “In the 21st century, we must learn to value our personal genetic code.

     

    Tweet me:The rapid rise of home #DNAtests like @23andMe and @Ancestry present new privacy and security issues, as the results are increasingly leveraged for applications that go far beyond customer curiosity http://bit.ly/2LmLqjr via @TriplePundit @amybrownCSR @Symantec

    KEYWORDS: AncestryDNA, 23andme, DNA Privacy, Data Privacy, Symantec, SS:Symantec2018, triplepundit, Amy Brown


    0 0

    Carbon Footprint Verification Conducted by SCS Global Services

    SOURCE:SCS Global Services

    DESCRIPTION:

    EMERYVILLE, Calif., December 28, 2018 /3BL Media/ - SCS Global Services (SCS), a global third-party certification body, announced today that Ledesma SAAI, an Argentinian agribusiness company that produces 40% of the nation’s printing and writing paper has earned Carbon Footprint Verification for its Office Ream paper product. This internationally recognized verification demonstrates Ledesma’s strong commitment to product transparency as part of its overall leadership in product stewardship and environmental sustainability.

    “Ledesma’s decision to validate the GHG emissions of its office ream paper sets an important example for the region’s paper production industry, and establishes a benchmark for further reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from paper production,” said Jaime de Monasterio, SCS’ Regional Director for Latin America.

    SCS conducted an assessment of the Carbon Footprint (CF) for Ledesma’s Office Ream paper based on the requirements of the WRI GHG Protocol and ISO 14064-3. The product – general office paper for consumers in Argentina – is manufactured at Ledesma’s mills primarily from bleached bagasse pulp (~92%) and softwood pulp (~8%). The verification considered the “cradle-to-grave” greenhouse gas emissions of the product, from raw material extraction through production, transport, use and recycling or disposal.

    Bagasse, the spent sugar fiber leftover from sugar cane harvest, comes from Ledesma’s sugar mill operations. The company operates the largest sugar mill in Argentina, producing refined sugar, corn syrups, ethyl alcohols, and other sugar products.

    For its softwood pulp, Ledesma is certified under the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) chain of custody program. “We have been FSC certified by SCS since 2014,” said Marcos Uribelarrea, Paper Business Director at Ledesma. “Our policy to source FSC-certified materials and to use our own waste products in paper production not only meets our sustainability values, but helps our bottom line. Through use of these sources, we are demonstrating our commitment to serving our customers for the long haul.”

    FSC certification and waste reuse initiatives are only part of the company’s sustainability leadership. Ledesma has made great strides in reusing water in its operations, installing closed-loop systems, and also designating more than 60% of its owned land as conservation areas, with support from the Argentinian government.

    About Ledesma
    Ledesma is an Argentinean agribusiness company committed to the development of the country. With more than 7,500 employees, Ledesma leads in the marketplace for sugar, printing paper, notebooks and school supplies. Its paper production alone is more than 700,000 metric tons per year. It also has a significant market share in the fruit and juice concentrates, meat, cereals, alcohol and ethanol, and corn syrups and starches. Its varied products have been satisfying customers and transforming markets for more than 100 years. Ledesma is built upon a legacy of family leadership, dedicated workers and suppliers, and the natural resources and communities found in the Yungas Forest and surrounding area.

    About SCS Global Services
    SCS Global Services has been a global leader in third-party environmental and sustainability certification, auditing, testing, and standards development for more than three decades. Its programs span a wide cross-section of industries, recognizing achievements in green building, product manufacturing, food and agriculture, forestry, power generation, and more. Headquartered in Emeryville, California, SCS has representatives and affiliate offices throughout the Americas, Asia/Pacific, Europe and Africa. Its broad network of auditors are experts in their fields, with a dedication to quality and professionalism. SCS is a chartered Benefit Corporation, reflecting its commitment to socially and environmentally responsible business practices.

    Tweet me:Argentinian Agribusiness Leader Ledesma Announces Verified #CarbonFootprint for Its Office Paper; verification conducted by @SCScertified. https://bit.ly/2LyJqoh

    KEYWORDS: Ledesma, scs global services, Carbon Footprint verification, carbon footprint, verification, GHG, green house gas emission, Argentina


    0 0

    SOURCE:GRI

    SUMMARY:

    On 20 November 2018, GRI CEO, Tim Mohin, rang the closing bell at Nasdaq, showing that non-financial reporting with the GRI Standards is becoming more relevant to investors in tech and beyond. 

    DESCRIPTION:

    A quarter of a century ago it would have been almost unthinkable for listed companies to feel obliged to report on their Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) impacts. Fifteen or 20 years ago, sustainability reporting was a niche topic. This is no longer the case: In 2017, more than half of shareholder resolutions involved ESG information.  

    GRI, which celebrated its 20 anniversary in 2017, is the leading standard setting organization for ESG information. And its importance to the investment community was again showcased during the bell ringing ceremony. As Evan Harvey, Global Head of Sustainability at Nasdaq pointed out, “GRI is the most comprehensive, practical and effective sustainable reporting standard in the world.  It has spent the past 20 years empowering companies to report ESG performance, standardizing the ways that we measure performance and capitalizing data to create social, environmental and economic change, as well as connecting stakeholders together in a public conversation on shared value creation.”

    Investors are now demanding that companies engage in sustainability reporting, so they can have useful and reliable information to assess risk beyond the financial, and beyond the short term. And now the question is no longer whether companies should report, to what companies should be reporting on. 

    But most importantly, as Tim Mohin, GRI’s Chief Executive reminded us all during the ceremony, “It’s not about more reports or more paperwork, it’s about making the world better. It’s about aligning capital with sustainable business practices. It’s about building a better world.”

    Click here for the latest GRI news

    Tweet me:Highlighting growing investor demand for non-financial reporting, @GRI_Secretariat rings the closing bell at Nasdaq: http://bit.ly/2T31SYB

    KEYWORDS: GRI, global reporting initiative, GRI Standards, sustainability reporting, SDG Reporting, esg, investors


    0 0

    SOURCE:Albertsons Companies

    DESCRIPTION:

    Hundreds of people came together to enjoy a hot meal on Christmas Eve – that they may not otherwise have had this holiday. The Christmas Eve feast was meant to warm the hearts of those in need. This meal is provided by the Salvation Army and Safeway.
     
    “Sometimes people are just down on their luck and a warm meal goes a long way,” said Todd Broderick, Safeway Denver Division President.

    Continue reading on CBS Denver

    Learn more about our philanthropic initiatives in our annual sustainability update

    Tweet me:.@Safeway and @SalvationArmyUS partner to serve holiday dinner to communities in need #MakeEveryDayABetterDay http://bit.ly/2SvB3wg

    KEYWORDS: Albertsons Companies, Safeway


    0 0

    7 more brands giving back this holiday season

    SOURCE:Whole Foods Market Foundations

    DESCRIPTION:

    88 Acres

    Woman-founded 88 Acres first opened its doors in Boston, where Whole Planet Foundation funds microcredit through microfinance partner Grameen America. Their goal was to open their bakery in an area of need to drive job growth in the community. Through their continued partnership with Whole Planet Foundation, 88 Acres also creates economic prosperity by finding microloans to support women microentrepreneurs domestically and internationally.

    During the month of December, $0.10 from 88 Acres Seed Butters sold in select Whole Foods Market stores will be donated to Whole Planet Foundation.

    Aspiring Artists of the Earth

    Aspiring Artists of the Earth (Here are) has been supplying Whole Foods Market stores with artisan-crafted collections for 13 years now. Owner and resident artist, Tari Zarka, also the resident glass artist, draws and digitizes the artwork used in their wood collections, which are made entirely in-house in Pennsylvania.

    “We believe in giving back. We donate a minimum of 5% of our profits to charity annually. We’re proud to support other female entrepreneurs with Whole Planet Foundation, donating $0.10 of each item sold in select Whole Foods Market stores during the month of December,” says Tari.

    Goodie Girl

    In 2010, Goodie Girl founder Shira Berk was running the café inside her children’s preschool when a fellow parent challenged her to create a gluten-free cookie modeled after the ones baked at the café. Today, she has built a sweet business selling cookies for people with special diets.

    “As a minority-run business, we’ve chosen to support Whole Planet Foundation this holiday season because we want to empower women microentrepreneurs in global communities,” said Shira Berk, Founder of Goodie Girl.”

    With every Goodie Girl cookie product sold in select Whole Foods Market stores, 3% of sales will be donated to Whole Planet Foundation.

    Greyston

    Greyston Bakery’s unique partnership with Whole Planet Foundation has served to advance both organizations’ social initiatives. In addition to supporting job creation at the Bakery, a percentage of brownie sales benefit Whole Planet Foundation.

    The team at Greyston Bakery says of the partnership: “During this holiday season and at a time when there is so much turmoil and inequality in the world, it’s comforting to know that Whole Planet Foundation continues to help alleviate poverty by lifting up some of the poorest entrepreneurs throughout the world with microloans. Greyston Bakery is proud to be a supporter of this life-changing mission. We also believe in helping others and we’ve been practicing that for over 35 years through our Open Hire™ policy where people with barriers to employment get hired – no questions asked.”

    With every purchase of a Greyston Bakery brownie at select Whole Foods Market stores, $0.25 will be donated to Whole Planet Foundation.

    Health-Ade

    Health-Ade Kombucha was started in 2012 by a husband, wife, and best friend in a true farmers’ market start-up story: a small credit card and a big dream to make REAL FOOD.

    Founder and CSO, Vanessa Dew says, “Whole Planet Foundation is aligned to Health-Ade’s values through and through.  One of Health-Ade’s main pillars of growth is built upon the entrepreneurial spirit and the extent to which we can support others to ‘follow their gut’, particularly when making huge social impact, is a position we will always take. The opportunity Whole Planet Foundation offers to tenacious, innovative, hardworking entrepreneurs that need access to resources to rise up from poverty is priceless.  We are proud partners of that mission especially during this season of giving, where everyone involved in making the future brighter, like Whole Planet Foundation, deserves a little Holiday Cheers!”

    For every purchase of Health-Ade’s Holiday Cheers kombucha at select Whole Foods Market stores, $0.10 will be donated to Whole Planet Foundation.

    Mop Top

    MopTop’s founder Kelly Foreman went years without a good hair day until she began the quest to find beauty in her wild curls. MopTop was the result – a line of natural, junk-free products that will make your hair turn heads, for all the best reasons.

    “Whole Planet Foundation totally lines up with our core values of Do the Right Thing & Empower our customers and each other! Love, love, love working to make a positive change in this world,” says Kelly, founder of Mop Top.

    With every purchase of MopTop products in select Whole Foods Market stores during the month of December, $0.50 will be donated to Whole Planet Foundation.

    The Republic of Tea

    The Republic of Tea embodies the ancient Chinese philosophy of Tashun — the Great Harmony — when people naturally care about the world and depend on each other for the well-being of the whole. It is a collective concern for others and aspiration to seek opportunities, initiatives and actions that will better the human condition as well as the planet.

    Through years of partnership with Whole Planet Foundation, The Republic of Tea has witnessed first-hand the incredible impact and success that comes from microfinance, empowering and lifting women and families out of poverty around the world where they source fine teas and herbs.

    During the month of December, $1.50 from every tin of Biodynamic Holiday Chai sold in select Whole Foods Market stores will be donated to Whole Planet Foundation.

    Learn more by visiting wholeplanetfoundation.org

    Tweet me:Here are 7 more brands who pledging to support #microloans for #womenentrepreneurs through @WholePlanet Foundation when you purchase their products at your local @WholeFoods this December http://bit.ly/2A8b730

    KEYWORDS: Whole Foods Market, Whole Foods Market Foundations, whole planet foundation, NASDAQ:WFM, The Republic of Tea, MopTop, Health-Ade Kombucha, Greyston, Goodie Girl, Aspiring Artists of the Earth, AAOTE, 88 Acres

          


    0 0

    By Sadie Marshall-Corley

    SOURCE:Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption

    DESCRIPTION:

    Sadie and her husband, Cody, adopted their son, Latrell, through the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption’s Wendy’s Wonderful Kids program. The Corleys, who live in Louisiana, want to raise awareness about the importance of foster care adoption, and specifically, the critical need to find permanent, loving homes for teenagers in foster care.

    People often say that our son is ‘lucky’ to have us, but they could never understand that we are the ones who are truly lucky and blessed to have him.

    My husband, Cody, and I had thought about adoption for a while. But adopting a teenager was never the plan, until it was. Cody is a middle school teacher and had a 14-year-old student named Latrell. Cody and Latrell formed a bond that extended from class to extracurricular activities. And it was during this time that Cody learned that Latrell was in foster care. Months later, I met Latrell.
    Latrell spent eight years in foster care. He needed a family. Before we finished the certification process, Latrell was moved to Monroe, Louisiana, which was about two hours away. Frustrated, but not deterred, we pressed on. We exchanged phone numbers, became Facebook friends and traveled to Monroe to take Latrell to dinner so we could see him and continue getting to know him.

    In October 2016, Latrell asked us if we were interested in adopting him. Prior to that, we had just been getting to know one another and hadn’t made any solid plans or promises. My heart almost burst when he asked that one question. It took a few more months, but Latrell moved into our home in February 2017.

    During this process, Kerri Byrd, our Wendy’s Wonderful Kids recruiter, was our guardian angel. I can’t tell you how many times I called her crying. The process was slow, and I felt like it was robbing us of time with our son. He was already 15, and we had limited time before he’d be off to college or living on his own.

    While Latrell was already a teenager when we met, his experiences had been so limited. It was heartbreaking at first, but we realized that it allowed us to experience a lot of the typical “firsts” with him that are often missed when an older child is adopted. We got to teach him how to drive and give him his own room for the first time in his life. We bought him his first plane ticket for his first trip out of state. We gave him his first dog, helped him secure his first job, and more. It has been an incredible journey.

    The biggest change for Latrell has been his grades. When he came to us, he was nearly failing. Today, he has a 3.5 GPA. He is now confident. It has been more amazing than I have the words to describe watching him blossom and develop a sense of self.

    To anyone considering foster care adoption, a teenager can bring out the most love and hope a person can have in their heart. We are so lucky to have met Latrell and be given the opportunity to bring him into our family. He is the light of our world, and we couldn’t imagine life without him in it.

    The Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption’s Wendy’s Wonderful Kids program provides grants to adoption agencies to hire and train recruiters in our Child-Focused Recruitment Model to find loving, permanent homes for the nearly 155,000 children waiting in foster care across the United States and Canada. The model is up to three times more effective at serving youth who have been in foster care the longest. Click here to learn more.

    Consider supporting our mission here and giving the gift of family.

    Tweet me:"He is the light of our world, and we couldn’t imagine life without him in it.” Read more about how foster care adoption and @DTFA are changing the lives of teenagers. http://bit.ly/2ElRUxH #Adoption #FosterCare #FindingForeverFamilie

    KEYWORDS: Dave Thomas, foster care, adoption, Recruiter, forever family, Wendy’s, National Adoption Month, Instant Family, Mark Wahlberg, Wendy’s Wonderful Kids, holiday, Giving, Gifts, gift, family, Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, Sadie Marshall-Corley, Cody Marshall-Corley

      


    0 0

    A Social enterprise delivers health services in India’s rural communities driven by disruptive technology and trained frontline health workers

    SOURCE:Business Call to Action (BCtA)

    DESCRIPTION:

    KOLKATA, India, December 27, 2018 /3BL Media/ - iKure is a rapidly growing tech start up, providing primary healthcare across rural, semi urban and urban populations in India. The company’s business model is composed of a unique combination of health outreach initiatives, skills development and technology-based interventions, promising to empower 5000 health entrepreneurs and deliver affordable health care to 25 million people across 11 Indian States.

    Launched in 2008, BCtA aims to accelerate progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by challenging companies to develop inclusive business models that engage people with less than US$10 per day in purchasing power (in 2015 dollars) as consumers, producers, suppliers and distributors. Over 225 companies, ranging from multinationals to social enterprises, and working in 70 countries, have responded to the BCtA by committing to improve the lives and livelihoods of millions in developing countries through access to markets, financial services, affordable healthcare, water and sanitation, education and other critical services.

    Rural health is a global challenge, not only because primary health services are generally not accessible or affordable to rural communities, but also because of the lack of capacity to implement programmes that address rural health care needs in a harmonized and holistic way.

    In India, 70 percent of the rural population (or over 840 million people) are served by less than 30 percent of the country’s combined medical force. This means there is one doctor per 19,000 people on average. Many families simply have no access to health care or are forced to rely on unreliable treatment plans and unqualified practitioners. Access to health care in rural communities is further complicated by long distances, lack of infrastructure, lack of education and poverty.

    iKure addresses these challenges by operating through a hub-and-spoke clinic model, where a core medical team utilizing modern procedures and equipment are stationed at hub clinic. Trained community health workers, who are selected and trained from each village, then visit peripheral clinics (spokes) on a regular basis and provide reliable access to on-site general medicine, maternal and child health care, eye care, telemedicine services, and pathology services to cater to the demand of specific diseases. After six months in the programme, community health workers become self-sustaining entrepreneurs, who generate income through selling and promoting products from the iKure supply chain.

    Technology forms a key part of iKure’s impact, as it enables patient information to be captured by community health workers on point-of-care devices offline. The information is uploaded to cloud storage when health workers return to web-connected areas. This process facilitates early diagnosis and tertiary linkages otherwise non-existent in India’s remote settings. Equipped with this information, iKure analyzes the root causes of ailments and addresses them holistically through combination of health and hygiene, nutrition and other aspects. By doing this, iKure creates an ecosystem of spokes clinics for diagnosis and minor treatments, hospitals for secondary and tertiary care and research organisations for clinical and technical knowhow of various ailments.

     “Our holistic approach towards health is supported by community-based interventions that are able to adapt to the different language, culture, diet, political power, literacy rates, ethnicity, employment and health services that exist in each area. This way, we are able to meet local needs as defined by the local community,” said ikure CEO Sujay Santra.

    “iKure’s model offers a three-layered approach that impacts the health and wellbeing of the individual patient, empowers community members as entrepreneurs and connects stakeholders at a global level to deliver future outcomes in rural health,” said Paula Pelaez, Head of Business Call to Action.

    For further information: 
    BCtA: aimee.brown@undp.org   
    iKure: sujay@ikure.in

    BCtA membership does not constitute a partnership with its funding and programme partners, UNDP or any UN agency.

    About Business Call to Action (BCtA): Launched at the United Nations in 2008, BCtA aims to accelerate progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by challenging companies to develop inclusive business models that offer the potential for both commercial success and development impact. BCtA is supported by  the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), UK Department for International Development (DFID), and hosted by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). For more information, please visit www.businesscalltoaction.org. 

    About iKure: iKure is an award-winning, tech-savvy, rapidly-growing, revenue-positive social enterprise that meets the primary health care and prevention needs through a unique combination of health outreach initiative, skills development, and technology intervention. The venture is poised to rapidly scale beyond its curative model, looking to the future of disease prevention and wellness for 840 million people in rural India. iKure’s healthcare model has acquired extensive support and recognitions from across the world for being innovative, technologically advanced and sustainable.

    Tweet me:A Social enterprise delivers #AffordableHealth services in #India’s rural communities driven by disruptive #technology and trained frontline health workers http://bit.ly/2S9LPIJ @BCtAInitiative @iKureTechSoft

    KEYWORDS: business call to action (bcta), iKure


    0 0

    G&A's Sustainability Highlights (12.20.2018)

    SOURCE:Governance & Accountability Institute, Inc.

    DESCRIPTION:

    In these last days of the year 2018, of course, we’ll be seeing shared expert perspectives on the year now ending and a look into the new year, 2019.  Sustainable Brands shared one person’s perspectives on three sustainability trends that are gaining momentum heading into 2019.

    The commentary is authored by Renee Yardley, VP-Sales & Marketing of Rolland Inc., a prominent North American commercial & security paper manufacturer established in 1882. The company strives to be an environmental leader in the pulp and paper industry. A wide range of fine paper products is made using renewable energy, recycled fiber, and de-inked without the use of chlorine.  Rolland started making recycled paper in 1989 and adopted biogas energy in 2004. The company is privately-owned and headquartered in Quebec, Canada.

    The trends the author explains, of course, affect users of all types of paper products but also are useful for businesses in other sectors & industries; he sees:  (1) a shifting of global recycling mindsets and in the circular economy; (2) more open collaboration and partnerships for impactful change; and (3) the need measurement and efforts to quantify impact. 

    Rolland is a paper supply company and so there is a focus on recycled (post-consumer) paper, fiber, forests, the recycled paper process, moving toward zero waste, municipal recycling in North America, and so on.

    On recycling:  we are seeing reports now of problems arising in the waste stream; in the USA, municipalities are calling for a reduction of waste and automating processes (to help reduce costs).  There are new online marketplaces as well for buying and selling recovered items.  The “market solution” is a great hope for the future as we continue to use paper products (we are not quite a paperless society, are we?).

    Part of the issues recycling advocates are dealing with:  China is restricting the import of recyclable materials (think:  that paper you put at curbside at home of business).  Consumers can be encouraged to reduce consumption but paper is paper and we all use it every day – so new approaches are urgently needed!

    This is just the introduction of G&A's Sustainability Highlights newsletter this week. Click here to view full issue. 

    Tweet me:Recycling – The Circular Economy: Admirable Efforts, With Significant Challenges As The Efforts Expand & Become More Complex for Businesses http://bit.ly/2T0HyHn

    KEYWORDS: MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS, business & trade, Corporate Social Responsibility, csr, G&A Institute, GRI, Governance & Accountability Institute, SRI, SWF, socially responsible investing, Sovereign Wealth Funds, sustainability, Corporate Citizenship, esg


    0 0

    By Sadie Marshall-Corley

    SOURCE:Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption

    DESCRIPTION:

    Sadie and her husband, Cody, adopted their son, Latrell, through the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption’s Wendy’s Wonderful Kids program. The Corleys, who live in Louisiana, want to raise awareness about the importance of foster care adoption, and specifically, the critical need to find permanent, loving homes for teenagers in foster care.

    People often say that our son is ‘lucky’ to have us, but they could never understand that we are the ones who are truly lucky and blessed to have him.

    My husband, Cody, and I had thought about adoption for a while. But adopting a teenager was never the plan, until it was. Cody is a middle school teacher and had a 14-year-old student named Latrell. Cody and Latrell formed a bond that extended from class to extracurricular activities. And it was during this time that Cody learned that Latrell was in foster care. Months later, I met Latrell.
    Latrell spent eight years in foster care. He needed a family. Before we finished the certification process, Latrell was moved to Monroe, Louisiana, which was about two hours away. Frustrated, but not deterred, we pressed on. We exchanged phone numbers, became Facebook friends and traveled to Monroe to take Latrell to dinner so we could see him and continue getting to know him.

    In October 2016, Latrell asked us if we were interested in adopting him. Prior to that, we had just been getting to know one another and hadn’t made any solid plans or promises. My heart almost burst when he asked that one question. It took a few more months, but Latrell moved into our home in February 2017.

    During this process, Kerri Byrd, our Wendy’s Wonderful Kids recruiter, was our guardian angel. I can’t tell you how many times I called her crying. The process was slow, and I felt like it was robbing us of time with our son. He was already 15, and we had limited time before he’d be off to college or living on his own.

    While Latrell was already a teenager when we met, his experiences had been so limited. It was heartbreaking at first, but we realized that it allowed us to experience a lot of the typical “firsts” with him that are often missed when an older child is adopted. We got to teach him how to drive and give him his own room for the first time in his life. We bought him his first plane ticket for his first trip out of state. We gave him his first dog, helped him secure his first job, and more. It has been an incredible journey.

    The biggest change for Latrell has been his grades. When he came to us, he was nearly failing. Today, he has a 3.5 GPA. He is now confident. It has been more amazing than I have the words to describe watching him blossom and develop a sense of self.

    To anyone considering foster care adoption, a teenager can bring out the most love and hope a person can have in their heart. We are so lucky to have met Latrell and be given the opportunity to bring him into our family. He is the light of our world, and we couldn’t imagine life without him in it.

    The Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption’s Wendy’s Wonderful Kids program provides grants to adoption agencies to hire and train recruiters in our Child-Focused Recruitment Model to find loving, permanent homes for the nearly 155,000 children waiting in foster care across the United States and Canada. The model is up to three times more effective at serving youth who have been in foster care the longest. Click here to learn more.

    Consider supporting our mission here and giving the gift of family.

    Tweet me:"He is the light of our world, and we couldn’t imagine life without him in it.” Read more about how foster care adoption and @DTFA are changing the lives of teenagers. http://bit.ly/2ElRUxH #Adoption #FosterCare #FindingForeverFamilie

    KEYWORDS: Dave Thomas, foster care, adoption, Recruiter, forever family, Wendy’s, National Adoption Month, Instant Family, Mark Wahlberg, Wendy’s Wonderful Kids, holiday, Giving, Gifts, gift, family, Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, Sadie Marshall-Corley, Cody Marshall-Corley

      


    0 0

    A Social enterprise delivers health services in India’s rural communities driven by disruptive technology and trained frontline health workers

    SOURCE:Business Call to Action (BCtA)

    DESCRIPTION:

    KOLKATA, India, December 27, 2018 /3BL Media/ - iKure is a rapidly growing tech start up, providing primary healthcare across rural, semi urban and urban populations in India. The company’s business model is composed of a unique combination of health outreach initiatives, skills development and technology-based interventions, promising to empower 5000 health entrepreneurs and deliver affordable health care to 25 million people across 11 Indian States.

    Launched in 2008, BCtA aims to accelerate progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by challenging companies to develop inclusive business models that engage people with less than US$10 per day in purchasing power (in 2015 dollars) as consumers, producers, suppliers and distributors. Over 225 companies, ranging from multinationals to social enterprises, and working in 70 countries, have responded to the BCtA by committing to improve the lives and livelihoods of millions in developing countries through access to markets, financial services, affordable healthcare, water and sanitation, education and other critical services.

    Rural health is a global challenge, not only because primary health services are generally not accessible or affordable to rural communities, but also because of the lack of capacity to implement programmes that address rural health care needs in a harmonized and holistic way.

    In India, 70 percent of the rural population (or over 840 million people) are served by less than 30 percent of the country’s combined medical force. This means there is one doctor per 19,000 people on average. Many families simply have no access to health care or are forced to rely on unreliable treatment plans and unqualified practitioners. Access to health care in rural communities is further complicated by long distances, lack of infrastructure, lack of education and poverty.

    iKure addresses these challenges by operating through a hub-and-spoke clinic model, where a core medical team utilizing modern procedures and equipment are stationed at hub clinic. Trained community health workers, who are selected and trained from each village, then visit peripheral clinics (spokes) on a regular basis and provide reliable access to on-site general medicine, maternal and child health care, eye care, telemedicine services, and pathology services to cater to the demand of specific diseases. After six months in the programme, community health workers become self-sustaining entrepreneurs, who generate income through selling and promoting products from the iKure supply chain.

    Technology forms a key part of iKure’s impact, as it enables patient information to be captured by community health workers on point-of-care devices offline. The information is uploaded to cloud storage when health workers return to web-connected areas. This process facilitates early diagnosis and tertiary linkages otherwise non-existent in India’s remote settings. Equipped with this information, iKure analyzes the root causes of ailments and addresses them holistically through combination of health and hygiene, nutrition and other aspects. By doing this, iKure creates an ecosystem of spokes clinics for diagnosis and minor treatments, hospitals for secondary and tertiary care and research organisations for clinical and technical knowhow of various ailments.

     “Our holistic approach towards health is supported by community-based interventions that are able to adapt to the different language, culture, diet, political power, literacy rates, ethnicity, employment and health services that exist in each area. This way, we are able to meet local needs as defined by the local community,” said ikure CEO Sujay Santra.

    “iKure’s model offers a three-layered approach that impacts the health and wellbeing of the individual patient, empowers community members as entrepreneurs and connects stakeholders at a global level to deliver future outcomes in rural health,” said Paula Pelaez, Head of Business Call to Action.

    For further information: 
    BCtA: aimee.brown@undp.org   
    iKure: sujay@ikure.in

    BCtA membership does not constitute a partnership with its funding and programme partners, UNDP or any UN agency.

    About Business Call to Action (BCtA): Launched at the United Nations in 2008, BCtA aims to accelerate progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by challenging companies to develop inclusive business models that offer the potential for both commercial success and development impact. BCtA is supported by  the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), UK Department for International Development (DFID), and hosted by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). For more information, please visit www.businesscalltoaction.org. 

    About iKure: iKure is an award-winning, tech-savvy, rapidly-growing, revenue-positive social enterprise that meets the primary health care and prevention needs through a unique combination of health outreach initiative, skills development, and technology intervention. The venture is poised to rapidly scale beyond its curative model, looking to the future of disease prevention and wellness for 840 million people in rural India. iKure’s healthcare model has acquired extensive support and recognitions from across the world for being innovative, technologically advanced and sustainable.

    Tweet me:A Social enterprise delivers #AffordableHealth services in #India’s rural communities driven by disruptive #technology and trained frontline health workers http://bit.ly/2S9LPIJ @BCtAInitiative @iKureTechSoft

    KEYWORDS: business call to action (bcta), iKure


    0 0

    SOURCE:Rebuilding Together

    DESCRIPTION:

    There’s often much more below the surface. If you look beyond the wall color at Rebuilding Together projects, you’ll see that we remove lead paint and mold which can have long lasting effect on the lives of children and other residents. We install drywall, waterproof interior masonry walls, prep and paint rooms and install dehumidifiers to give our neighbors a dry place to live.

    This new year, help us bring a fresh coat of paint and necessary repairs to our neighbors in need. Rebuild a House. Create a Home. https://rebuild.rebuildingtogether.org/

    Tweet me:Lead paint and mold can have long lasting effects on the lives of children and other residents. Help your neighbors start the new year with a fresh coat of paint! http://bit.ly/2SZVrFR @RebldgTogthr #holidaygiving #RebuildAHouse

    KEYWORDS: rebuilding together, Rebuild A House, lead paint, mold, home improvement, Wellness, Wellbeing, holiday giving


    0 0

    G&A's Sustainability Highlights (12.20.2018)

    SOURCE:Governance & Accountability Institute, Inc.

    DESCRIPTION:

    In these last days of the year 2018, of course, we’ll be seeing shared expert perspectives on the year now ending and a look into the new year, 2019.  Sustainable Brands shared one person’s perspectives on three sustainability trends that are gaining momentum heading into 2019.

    The commentary is authored by Renee Yardley, VP-Sales & Marketing of Rolland Inc., a prominent North American commercial & security paper manufacturer established in 1882. The company strives to be an environmental leader in the pulp and paper industry. A wide range of fine paper products is made using renewable energy, recycled fiber, and de-inked without the use of chlorine.  Rolland started making recycled paper in 1989 and adopted biogas energy in 2004. The company is privately-owned and headquartered in Quebec, Canada.

    The trends the author explains, of course, affect users of all types of paper products but also are useful for businesses in other sectors & industries; he sees:  (1) a shifting of global recycling mindsets and in the circular economy; (2) more open collaboration and partnerships for impactful change; and (3) the need measurement and efforts to quantify impact. 

    Rolland is a paper supply company and so there is a focus on recycled (post-consumer) paper, fiber, forests, the recycled paper process, moving toward zero waste, municipal recycling in North America, and so on.

    On recycling:  we are seeing reports now of problems arising in the waste stream; in the USA, municipalities are calling for a reduction of waste and automating processes (to help reduce costs).  There are new online marketplaces as well for buying and selling recovered items.  The “market solution” is a great hope for the future as we continue to use paper products (we are not quite a paperless society, are we?).

    Part of the issues recycling advocates are dealing with:  China is restricting the import of recyclable materials (think:  that paper you put at curbside at home of business).  Consumers can be encouraged to reduce consumption but paper is paper and we all use it every day – so new approaches are urgently needed!

    This is just the introduction of G&A's Sustainability Highlights newsletter this week. Click here to view full issue. 

    Tweet me:Recycling – The Circular Economy: Admirable Efforts, With Significant Challenges As The Efforts Expand & Become More Complex for Businesses http://bit.ly/2T0HyHn

    KEYWORDS: MEDIA & COMMUNICATIONS, business & trade, Corporate Social Responsibility, csr, G&A Institute, GRI, Governance & Accountability Institute, SRI, SWF, socially responsible investing, Sovereign Wealth Funds, sustainability, Corporate Citizenship, esg


older | 1 | .... | 382 | 383 | (Page 384) | 385 | 386 | .... | 395 | newer